Jae Yung Song, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

[Image] Jae Yung Song

Enderis Hall, Room 855
Phone: (414) 229-2665
Fax: (414) 229-2620
songjy@uwm.edu

Department

Communication Sciences & Disorders

Education

  • Postdoctoral training, Speech Communication Group, RLE, MIT
  • Postdoctoral training, Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Brown University
  • Ph.D., Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences, Brown University
  • M.S., English Language and Literature, Korea University
  • B.A., English Language and Literature, Korea University


Speaker Topics

  • Phonetics
  • Phonological Development

Interests & Expertise

Dr. Jae Yung Song is interested in the acoustic and articulatory characteristics of child and child-directed speech, and their implications for the development of the phonological representation of words. Dr. Song uses converging evidence from several sources including experimental speech production data and longitudinal speech corpora, and ultrasound recordings of tongue movements during the articulation of speech sounds. Dr. Song leads a Phonetics Lab in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders.


Recent Publications

Song, J. Y., Demuth, K., & Shattuck-Hufnagel, S. (2012). The development of acoustic cues to coda contrasts in young children learning American English. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 131(4), 3036-3050.

Song, J. Y., Demuth, K., & Morgan, J. L. (2010). Effects of the acoustic properties of infant-directed speech on infant word recognition. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 128(1), 389-400.

Song, J. Y., Sundara, M., & Demuth, K. (2009). Phonological constraints on children’s production of English third person singular -s. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 52(3), 623-642.

Song, J. Y., & Demuth, K. (2008). Compensatory vowel lengthening for omitted coda consonants: A phonetic investigation of children’s early representations of prosodic words. Language and Speech, 51(4), 385-402.


Book Chapters

Demuth, K., & Song, J. Y. (2012). How phonological representations develop during first language acquisition. In A. C. Cohn, C. Fougeron, M. Huffman (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Laboratory Phonology (pp. 397-406). New York, NY: Oxford: Oxford University Press.