Department of Kinesiology

Instructor's Handbook


For additional information please contact:
Tracy Oles-Fairchild, Undergraduate Program Director
Enderis 413, 229-6694
teo@uwm.edu

8/30/02


TABLE OF CONTENTS

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

SECTION I: University and Department General Policy
Introduction
Mission Statement
Program Description
Academic Advising
Registration
Change of Registration
Student Classification
Other Registration Alternatives and Related Information
Course Administration: Grading and Related Policies
Drop Policy
Withdrawal
Admission Requirements
Student Conduct
Alcohol and Illicit Drugs
Special Accommodations
Affirmative Action/Harassment
Discrimination
Sexual Assault
Student Academic Appeals

SECTION II: Course Administration
Expectations of Instructor
Course Syllabus
Teaching Principles
Full-Speed Sparing
Course Roster
Waiting Lists and Dropping Students
Adding and Dropping Procedures
Use of PAWS

SECTION III: Use of Klotsche Center and Engelmann Gym - Policies and Procedures
Room Assignments
Equipment - Students
Equipment - Instructors
Emergency Procedures
Emergency Action Plan: Klotsche Center
Emergency Action Plan: Engelmann Gym

SECTION IV: Support and Resources
Audio-Visual Equipment
Typing and Duplication Services
Books, Anthologies, and Other Reading Materials
Parking Permits for Guest Speakers
Information and Media Technologies Facilities
Software (Microcomputer) Use
Multimedia Classroom Training and Other Media Requests
Library Services
Library Reserve Materials
Electronic Research
Student Accessibility Center
Student Organizations

SECTION V: Expectations of Conduct
Staff Conduct
Political Activities
Discrimination
Cultural Sensitivity


ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Questions about University and Administrative Policy, contact:

Kristian O'Connor, Ph.D., Chair
Department of Kinesiology
Enderis Hall, Room 471
414-229-2680
krisocon@uwm.edu

Questions about Department Policy or Undergraduate Program, contact:

Tracy Oles-Fairchild, M.S., Undergraduate Program Director
Department of Kinesiology
Enderis 413, 229-6694
teo@uwm.edu

Specific questions about class rosters, add/drops, grade reports, or contract information,  or when notifying the Department when unable to make class, contact:

Wendy Pribbanow, University Services Program Associate
Department of Kinesiology
Enderis Hall, Room 411 (office hours 8:00am-4:30pm)
414-229-6080


SECTION I:
University and Department General Policy

INTRODUCTION

This handbook was compiled to aid Department of Kinesiology instructors in understanding pertinent academic procedures and regulations. The material in this handbook was gathered from UWM's Undergraduate Bulletin, Graduate Bulletin, Schedule of Classes and Department Policy and Procedure Handbook. The Department of Kinesiology faculty and staff provided additional details. More information can be obtained by consulting these publications or by contacting the Department Chair (229-4591) or Undergraduate Program Coordinator (229-3303). ThisInstructor's Handbook includes academic policies, procedures, programs, courses and requirements in effect at the time of publication. Changes made after the publication of this handbook may affect students' programs. Efforts will be made to publicize all changes, but it is the responsibility of students to ascertain the requirements of their programs at all times.


MISSION STATEMENT

Consistent with the nature of a Research II Institution, the mission of the Department of Kinesiology is premised on the philosophy that the generation of knowledge serves as the foundation for all scholarly activity. Therefore, the mission of the Department of Kinesiology is to engage in the generation, dissemination, integration, and application of knowledge specific to human movement in various contexts. These contexts comprise health promotion, maintenance, and rehabilitation in social settings ranging from medicine to recreation to education to industry. Department faculty conduct research that contributes to the knowledge base in the human movement sciences and informs curricular content. The Department of Kinesiology provides an undergraduate and graduate curriculum that enables students to understand human movement, as it is expressed in physical activity, by integrating scientific and humanistic perspectives; by analyzing movement within an allied health context; by understanding the critical, social, behavioral, and physical bases of movement; and by applying this knowledge in diverse settings.

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PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The Department of Kinesiology offers a four year curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology. Students must declare one of the submajor areas in Kinesiology program - athletic training, exercise and fitness, health and fitness management, kinesiology, or pre-physical therapy. The program for all submajors consists of pre-professional study (freshman and sophomore curriculum) and professional study (junior and senior curriculum) leading to the completion of 128 credits in the kinesiology, pre-physical therapy and athletic training submajors, and 131 credits in the exercise and fitness and health, and fitness management submajors. The curricular areas include core courses, general education, emphasis courses, and electives.

The Department of Kinesiology also sponsors and administers general sport and recreation courses. These courses include a series of one-credit courses offered both on-and off-campus. They are co-administered by the College of Health Sciences’ Continuing Education Outreach Program. Many of these activity courses are taught within the Klotsche Center for Physical Education (sometimes referred to as "KCPE") and are taken by students to fulfill electives or for personal recreation. (Note: The Klotsche Center is administratively housed under the Division of Student Affairs and has a separate set of administrative rules and policies, most of which have been incorporated into this manual.)


ACADEMIC ADVISING
Undergraduate Students

The Student Advising Office is located on the 1st Floor of Merrill Hall. Within this Office, there is a full-time professional academic advisor who is familiar with the curriculum and the special needs of kinesiology students. The Kinesiology advisor is Susan Gruzis. She is trained to provide all of the technical information needed for students to make their own decisions regarding their education.

Students do not need academic approval to register for courses each semester. Advisors are trained to provide services such as freshmen orientation, program counseling, course selection, registration guidance, and credit transfer, ultimately, the responsibility for selecting courses and meeting requirements rests with the student.

The Degree Audit Report System (DARS) used by the Student Services Center provides students and advisors with the most current information regarding a student's progress toward completing a degree. The staff also evaluates and processes all student promotions to the major and performs reviews of the degree-audit components of each major field to ensure smooth processing of graduation activities.

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REGISTRATION

1. Priority (Mail) and Free Access (Add/Drop) Registration

Registration forms are mailed to each student eligible to register, including new and re-entering students. Registration forms may be returned to the Registrar's Office (Mellencamp 274) by mail or in person. In order to be included in the computer-assisted scheduling procedure (Priority Registration), the registration forms must arrive on or before the priority deadlines published in the Schedule of Classes. Students who miss priority registration can register after the priority date (in person during the free access and add/drop period). Registration forms will be processed every two weeks. Consult the Schedule of Classes for registration dates and deadlines, and for more specific information on the registration procedure.

Late registration takes place after the classes for a semester or summer session have begun. A $25 fee is assessed to students who register late. Students are able to register through the first two weeks of classes. The "add" deadline is published in each semester's Schedule of Classes.


2. Priorities in Priority Registration

Priority registration (also referred to as mail or computer-assisted registration) uses the following priorities in class assignments:

  1. Priority Date. There are priority (or deadline) dates for fall and spring term, and for summer sessions.
  2. Year-in-School. Generally, graduate students first, followed by seniors, freshmen, juniors, sophomores, and specials (non-degree students).
  3. Date registration request is received in the Department of Enrollment Services.

3. Enrollment in Undergraduate Human Kinetics Courses

• Pre-Kinesiology (PKIN), Pre-Physical Therapy (PPHT), and UWM special students who do not hold an undergraduate degree USS-9) are not eligible to register for 300, 400 and 500-level courses. Pre-Kinesiology Seniors (PKIN-3 and PKIN-4) and Pre-Physical Therapy (PPHT-3 and PPHT-4) may seek special approval to enroll in upper level Human Kinetics courses; this approval is based on successful completion of prerequisites and the student's grade point average.

• UWM special students who do not hold an undergraduate degree (USS-9) can register for 100 and 200-level Human Kinetics courses if they meet course prerequisites, including class standing criteria.

• Non-Kinesiology degree students can register for 300, 400, or 500-level courses if they have completed course prerequisites and can provide evidence of an overall GPA of 2.5 or above. Priority in these courses is given to students classified as either (KIN or PPHT).


4. Course Prerequisites

Course prerequisites are established to insure that students have adequate background preparation for specific courses. In unusual circumstances, if the instructor believes that a student, without specific course prerequisites, is capable of successfully completing a course, the instructor may support the student's appeal of the prerequisite to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator. If the faculty member teaching the course is an adjunct faculty member, support from a tenure track faculty member must be included. Students lacking the prerequisites for a particular course can be dropped administratively from that course by the Undergraduate Program Coordinator.

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CHANGE OF REGISTRATION

Post-Priority Registration and Changes in Registration (Adding/Dropping Classes)

The forms needed to make changes in registration are available at any department office or the Department of Enrollment Services.

Following the Priority Registration period, students who attempted to register and were not able to obtain a satisfactory schedule are able to process changes to their schedules at the Registration Processing Center (Bolton 180) or through PAWS. During the Controlled-Access Period students may make changes according to a schedule based on their year in school. Dates and times for access are published in the Schedule of Classes each semester.

During both the controlled and free access add/drop periods, the Department of Enrollment Services will be able to add students to courses in most departments on a space available basis at the Registration Processing Center. However, some departments may require that students first visit the department office to obtain written approval on their registration or add forms.

Once classes begin for the semester, all late registrations and all add/drop transactions require written departmental approval on all registration and add/drop forms. Courses may be added during the first two weeks of classes. Adding courses at this time requires the signature of the course instructor. 

Unless a shorter deadline is established by a department and stated in the Schedule of Classes, a student may drop courses with the written approval of the instructor (signature) or the department through the end of the eighth week of classes. A student attempting to drop courses after the eighth week may do so only for reasons of extraordinary circumstance not related to academic performance in the course. In order to drop a course after the eighth week, an undergraduate student must first obtain written approval from the instructor and then file a written appeal with the advising office of his/her school or college. Only if both the instructor and the school/college approve will such drops be permitted. (All courses dropped after the fourth week of classes will remain on the student record and will be reflected on transcripts with a symbol of "W". For courses that meet for less than the full academic semester (fall/spring terms) and for summer session courses, the above deadlines will be adjusted in proportion to the length of the course.  

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STUDENT CLASSIFICATIONS

Classifications combine the degree program with the student's year in school. For example: KIN-3 is a Kinesiology Junior. The following list explains all Kinesiology student classifications. 

CLASSIFICATION: EXPLANATION

PKIN-1,2,3,4: Bachelor of Science: Pre-Kinesiology
KIN-3,4: Bachelor of Science: Kinesiology
PPHT-1,2,3,4: Bachelor of Science: Kinesiology - Pre-Physical Therapy Track

Specials:

KINS-9: Bachelor of Science: Kinesiology - Undergraduate Special Student
PTS-9: Bachelor of Science: Kinesiology - Pre-Physical Therapy Track - Undergraduate Special
Student
USS-9: UWM special students who do not hold an undergraduate degree

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OTHER REGISTRATION ALTERNATIVES AND RELATED INFORMATION

1. Reading and Project Courses

The faculty of the Department of Kinesiology recognize that an independent study course or project may enhance the program of study of an individual student. To provide a framework for such courses the following guidelines have been adopted.

A. Students must meet with the faculty member who will supervise the course to agree upon the following:

-- An outline of the specific reading or research to be undertaken.

-- The methodology or study approach to be used.

-- The project output (i.e. report, paper, presentation, etc.)

-- The grading plan.

B. The supervising faculty member must be a full-time tenure-track professor or full-time teaching academic staff on a probationary/indefinite appointment.

C. Applications (see Page 3 of the Appendix) containing the above information must be submitted to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator (Enderis 413) prior to enrollment in the course. The section number to be used is the instructor's number found in the current Schedule of Classes. Please note that code numbers change each semester. All Reading and Independent Project courses must be added prior to the add deadline.

2. Auditing Courses

There are two types of audit alternatives available at UWM:

A. The first is for the special student that wishes to attend UWM as an audit-only student. Students should contact Special & Adult Student Service in Mellencamp 262 (X6732) for further information. Students must obtain the signature of the instructor of each course they wish to audit before submitting the registration form. All laboratory courses and courses comprising certificate programs are closed to non-degree audit-only students as indicated by the "#" symbol preceding the course number in the Schedule of Classes.

B. The second is for the UWM degree student who wishes to audit a course in addition to his/her regular course load. The student must have the instructor's signature or Department stamp in order to register for the course on an "audit" basis. The instructor's signature should be obtained when the audit student meets with the instructor of the course to reach agreement concerning the standards for attendance and performance to be met by the audit student. If all attendance and performance standards are met, the instructor will report a final grade of "S" (Satisfactory) and the course will appear on the student's transcript. If these standards are not met, the instructor will report a grade of "UNREC". The "UNREC" grades will not appear on the student's transcript and there will be no indication on the transcript that the student registered for the course. The audit student does not receive degree credit for the course. However, an audit course may later be repeated once for credit.

3. Variable Credit Courses

Several courses within the Department of Kinesiology's curriculum carry variable credit. This designation refers to the number of credits for which a student registers. When completing a registration form, the student enters the appropriate number of credits. HUM KIN 298 and HUM KIN 489 are two of the variable credit courses. The level of credit earned depends upon the workload assigned to the course. It is required that course syllabi explain how course credit will be assigned.

4. Credit/No Credit or Pass/Fail

Students may only take courses on a credit/no credit basis if they are courses being taken to fulfill distribution requirements or are electives that are outside the Department of Kinesiology, and are not required for a student's major. Human Kinetics courses are not available to anv undergraduate students on a credit/no credit grading basis. Courses required for admission to the Kinesiology major cannot be taken credit/no credit.

5. Semester Course Load for "Full-Time" Status

A full-time undergraduate student in the Department of Kinesiology takes a course load of 12 to 18 credits. If the student earned a B average (3.0) or better in the preceding semester, on the basis of at least 14 graded credits, that student may carry a program of up to 20 credits if the program includes no more than 6 courses. An overload approval must be granted by the Undergraduate Program Coordinator prior to the start of the semester.

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COURSE ADMINISTRATION: GRADING AND RELATED POLICIES

1. Introduction

This section covers many of the administrative responsibilities of operating a course at UWM. Each section covers basic rules, policies, and procedures to follow in establishing and operating a course.

2. Course Outlines

Faculty Senate Document 1895 states that "At the first class session, each student in each course will be supplied a syllabus that contains essential information about the course and department policies that affect the conduct of the course." All faculty and instructors are expected to provide students and the Department of Kinesiology Undergraduate Director with a course outline to be distributed on the first day of class. The outline should contain, at the minimum, the following information:

  • course number and meeting times/dates
  • student consultation/office hours
  • office room number
  • telephone number for student consultations (optional)
  • textbook(s) to be used
  • topics to be covered by week/session
  • reading assignments for every week/session
  • mid-term and final examination dates, and grading system (including weights given to mid-term exam(s), final exam, quizzes if any, and term paper, if any).

Syllabi and examinations for courses from previous semesters are available for your perusal. See Susan Cashin, Undergraduate Program Coordinator for additional assistance.

3. Hours

It is required that each faculty and teaching academic staff member maintain appropriate scheduled office hours to allow additional student access. You will be requested each semester to prepare a schedule of office/class hours.

4. Class Cancellation and Related Policies

Any class cancellations, changes in class hours, room changes, and/or examination time changes must be submitted to the Chair of the Department of Kinesiology and be approved prior to institution.

If you know IN ADVANCE that you must miss class (in order of administrative preference);

A. Obtain an approved substitute for the class (Any person substituting for class must be pre-approved by Cynthia Hasbrook, Department Chair, OR)

B. Include date of class period which must be canceled in your syllabus and do not hold class that day, OR,

C. Notify class in advance of class cancellation

D. If you must miss class at late notice, due to illness or emergency, contact Wendy Pribbanow, Program Assistant for the Department of Kinesiology at 229-6080.

5. Mid-term and Final Examinations

It is strongly recommended that mid-term exams be graded and returned within 10 days of the scheduled exam to provide appropriate feedback to students.

Each semester the Schedule of Classes prints a University Examination Schedule prepared by the Secretary of the University. Each student is responsible for arranging a study list that will permit satisfactory progress towards degree requirements and a class schedule that avoids (a) class and final exam scheduling conflicts and (b) an excessively demanding exam schedule. Because students know in advance when their exams are to be held and plan their study time accordingly, final exams should be given during the scheduled final examination period. Final exams for late hour classes should be held at the regular meeting time during the week of final exams. One-hour final examinations in one-credit courses may be given during the last class period; two-hour final examinations in all other courses shall be given during the regular examination period. The time of a final examination for an individual or a class cannot be changed except in extenuating circumstances and requires the prior approval of the Office of Dean. The change can only involve a postponement to a later date. The Secretary of the University should be notified of any approved changes in final examinations in order to avoid scheduling conflicts of day, hour, and room.

The academic department, in consultation with the appropriate dean or director, is authorized to exempt particular courses from the final examination, when it is determined that no essential educational purpose is served by a two-hour final examination.

6. Examination Materials

For a period of one year following the term in which the course is given, instructors shall maintain records that are sufficient to: 1) determine if an error was made in assigning or recording a grade, 2) show that the grading conforms to the instructor's announced grading policy, 3) determine the grade for a student removing an incomplete, and 4) report the performance of students who attended for only part of the term. It is suggested that instructors preserve examinations and written material not returned to students as well as class grade books.

7. Responsibility of Evaluation

The evaluation of a student's performance in a course and a decision on the appropriate grade is the responsibility of the designated instructor or instructors. The principle of equal treatment of all students shall be a fundamental guide in responding to requests for special consideration. No student should be given an opportunity to improve a grade that is not made available to all members of the class. This policy is not intended to exclude reasonable accommodation of verified student disability, or the completion of work missed as the result of religious observance, verified illness, or justified absence due to circumstances beyond the student's control.

Faculty Document 1927 outlines the policies on grading and grade records. This document is available from your department chair and at http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/acad+admin_policies/S29.htm. You should consult it for information on responsibilities for evaluation, grade and record changes, record keeping and special consideration.

8. Grading Attendance/Participation

Instructors are given academic freedom to determine how to evaluate performance of students in the academic setting. It is strongly recommended that attendance not be used as criteria for issuing a grade, but rather active participation in class projects, discussions, and other experiences relevant to the course objectives.

9. Confidentiality of Grades

Instructors occasionally are contacted by parents, other relatives or friends of students, prospective employers, credit agencies, or other instructors for information about student grades. Under federal legislation, grades are confidential information and cannot be released, except to UWM school officials, without a written waiver by the student. Students, however, may check with the instructor about a grade.

The posting of grades is a common practice throughout the University. While such practice is intended to provide a service to students and is often intended to be confidential, caution should be taken to avoid a violation of students' right to privacy. The Federal Educational Right to Privacy Act (FERPA) was enacted in 1974 to provide access to students' educational records by the student while preventing access by unauthorized third parties. FERPA impacts the practice of grade posting in two respects:

A. Social security numbers constitute personally identifiable information which is directly related to the student and, therefore, their disclosure is prohibited; and

B. A student's grades are part of the education record maintained by the educational institution and protected from disclosure.

Some instructors utilize University Student Identification Numbers (SIN) for grade posting. Since these "SINs" are derived from student social security numbers, their use poses a risk of a breach of privacy. Any posting of grades by social security number or in an order that directly correlates with the alphabetical list for the class increases the chance of a student being identified and is legally questionable.

In order to protect the students' right to privacy, the following courses of action may be utilized:

A. Consider discontinuing the posting of student grades. The students who want to know their grades before official reports are sent out can submit a self-addressed, stamped envelope to the instructor.

B. If it is imperative that grades be posted and that the last four digits of the "SINs" be used, then rearrange those "SINs" so as not to correlate with the alphabetical class list.

C. Post grades using a random number designed to preserve the student's identity.

All other requests for information concerning student grades should be directed to the UWM Records Review office (229-5781).

Students may review final course grades PAWS.

10. lncompIete Policies

An incomplete may be given to an undergraduate student who has carried a subject successfully until the end of the semester but, because of illness or some other unusual and substantiated cause beyond the student's control, has been unable to complete the final examination or some limited amount of course work. An incomplete is not given unless the student proves to the instructor that s/he was prevented from completing course requirements for just cause as indicated above.

For undergraduate students, a course marked Incomplete must be completed during the first eight weeks of the next succeeding semester of enrollment, excluding summer sessions. An extension of time to the end of the semester is possible if extenuating circumstances prevent the student from completing the course during the first eight weeks. Extensions must be recommended by the instructor and approved by the Dean of the student's school or college. If the student does not remove the incomplete during the first eight weeks of the next semester of enrollment, the report of "l" will lapse to "F". Change of grade cards submitted for work completed after the eight-week deadline cannot be processed without approval of an extension.

An incomplete will not be given to enable a student to do additional work to improve a grade.

The instructor may deny a request for an incomplete and assign a letter grade based on the work completed at that point. It is the student's responsibility to initiate a request for an incomplete. Reasons for requesting the incomplete must be acceptable to the instructor. If approved, the instructor will indicate the conditions for the removal of the incomplete including the date for submitting all remaining work.

When the work required for removal of an incomplete has been completed, the new grade should be submitted by the instructor on a change of grade card to the Kinesiology Department Office. Change of grade cards are provided to instructors upon request and must be picked up in person at the Kinesiology Department Office (END 411).

11. Change of Grades

Instructors may not change a semester grade after the grade sheet has been submitted to the Registrar except for an inadvertent error in determining or recording the grade. Any change in a student's grade of record, including retroactive change to drop, withdrawal, or incomplete, must receive the approval of the Dean of the School or College in which the student was enrolled at the time the course was taken. The form used to change a grade is available to faculty members at the Kinesiology Department Office (END 411). (A change of grade form is shown on Page 4 of the Appendix).

12. Reporting Grades for Reinstated Students or Students who Added Late

Students who have been reinstated or may have added a course late may not appear on the original Grade Reporting Sheet. For these students, a seperate Grade Report will be generated by the Department of Enrollment Services and forwarded to the instructor via the Department Office. The Form must be completed by the instructor, signed, and returned to the Program Assistant in the Department of Kinesiology Office.

13. Repeating Courses

General Courses. Unless a restriction is stated in the Schedule of Classes, undergraduates may repeat any course only once. Under exceptional circumstances, one more repeat may be allowed following approval of a written appeal to the advising office of the student's school or college. Except in the case of courses with variable content (which may be repeated for credit as often as permitted for that particular course, as specified in the Undergraduate Bulletin), both grades earned for repeated courses will appear on the student's academic record, but with only the highest grade calculated into the grade point average.

Students who took a course as a repeat prior to Fall 1989 are entitled to one additional enrollment. Transfer students who did not previously take a course at UWM are entitled to one repeat at UWM of a course taken at a previous institution. Students should not repeat a course in which they have an "incomplete". It is generally advisable for any student to consult an advisor before registering to repeat a course.

Core Courses. Students in the undergraduate programs offered by the Department of Kinesiology will be allowed to repeat no more than three undergraduate courses offered by the Department (i.e., Human Kinetic and Sport and Recreation courses) during their pursuit of an undergraduate degree. The Kinesiology Course and Curriculum Committee will consider appeals to repeat more than three courses in special cases. The courses that fall into this limitation policy include the following courses:

HUM KIN 200 Introduction to Kinesiology
HUM KIN 280 Field Experience in Kinesiology
HUM KIN 216 Organization and Administration of Athletic Training
HUM KIN 314 Recognition and Evaluation of Injuries: Lower Body
HUM KIN 315 Recognition and Evaluation of Injuries: Upper Body
HUM KIN 413 Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training
HUM KIN 414 Therapeutic Exercise in Athletic Training
HUM KIN 230 Health Aspects of Exercise and Nutrition
HUM KIN 270 Statistics in Health Professions: Theory and Practice
HUM KIN 312 Introduction to Prevention, Care, and Treatment of Athletic Injuries
HUM KIN 320 Biomechanics
HUM KIN 330 Exercise Physiology
HUM KIN 350 Psychological Aspects of Leisure and Movement
HUM KIN 351 Sociological Aspects of Leisure and Movement
HUM KIN 430 Exercise Testing for Fitness Assessment and Prescription
HUM KIN 460 Introduction to Motor Development
HUM KIN 461 Principles of Motor Learning
HUM KIN 480 Organization and Administration in the Health and Fitness Industry
HUM KIN 481 Program Development and Evaluation in the Fitness Industry
HUM KIN 488 Professional Preparation Seminar

Internship. Students may repeat any one course in the undergraduate core one time with the exception of the Kinesiology Internship and Seminar (HUM KIN 489). This course may be taken one time only. Students who fail the course or are terminated from their internship may appeal to the Department of Kinesiology Course and Curriculum Committee (recommendation to Department for approval) for reinstatement. A student who recognizes a problem in the internship prior to the sixth week may, upon approval of internship coordinator, withdraw from the internship and be allowed to repeat the course/internship during the following semester, provided an internship site is available. If the student withdraws a second time, he/she must appeal to the Department of Kinesiology Course and Curriculum Committee for permission to re-enroll a third time in Kinesiology Internship and Seminar (HUM KIN 489).

14. Action Regarding Unsatisfactory Grades

University-wide Undergraduate Academic Action Policy: A student whose grade point average falls below minimum university-wide standards for any grading period, or whose academic status cannot be determined due to outstanding incompletes or unreported grades, may be subject to the University's uniform academic probation/drop policy. The policy, which went into effect Semester I of the 1993-94 school year, establishes minimum standards for undergraduate students enrolled in schools and colleges.

Academic Probation: Academic Probation: Cumulative grade point average falls below 2.0. The student on academic academic probation whose semester grade point average is 2.0 or better, but whose cumulative grade point average remains below a 2.0. is permitted to continue on academic probation.

Cleared ProbationCleared Probation: Cumulative grade point average increases to 2.0 or above.

Dropped for One Semester: Dropped for One Semester: Imposed on any student on academic probation who fails to earn a semester grade point average of 2.0 or a new freshman who fails to achieve a semester grade point average of 1.0 or higher.

Final Probation: Final Probation: Applies to student who is permitted to enroll after any drop action. The student on final probation whose semester grade point average is 2.0 or better, but whose cumulative grade point average remains below 2.0, is permitted to continue on final academic probation.

Dropped for Two Years: Dropped for Two Years: Imposed on any student on final probation who fails to achieve a semester grade point average of 2.0 or better.

Reinstatement/Readmission: Any student who has been dropped has the right to appeal the action, in a written request, to the College of Health Sciences, who may choose to reinstate the student. At the end of the drop period, the student may appeal, in a written request, to the Assistant Dean, Student Affairs, College of Health Sciences, for readmission. Such students are reinstated or readmitted on final probation. Any student who has been dropped has the right to appeal the action, in a written request, to the College of Health Sciences, who may choose to reinstate the student. At the end of the drop period, the student may appeal, in a written request, to the Assistant Dean, Student Affairs, College of Health Sciences, for readmission. Such students are reinstated or readmitted on final probation.

15. Grade Point Average

A cumulative of all grades earned at UWM composes a student's Grade Point Average (GPA). Grade point averages are accumulated for both semester grades and overall grades. The grade point average is based upon UWM credit earned or attempted. Even though a student may receive degree credits for coursework taken elsewhere; grades for such transfer credits are not included in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee grade point average. However, transfer credit grades are used to determine advancement toward the major requirements and graduation requirements. In addition, UWM credits taken as "Audit" do not apply to the UWM GPA.

Each letter grade carries a specific number of grade points per credit. The scale of grades and points is as follows:

Grades Grade Points

A (Excellent) = 4.00
A- = 3.67
B+ = 3.33
B (Good) = 3.00
B- = 2.67
C+ = 2.33
C (Fair) = 2.00
C- = 1.67
D+ = 1.33
D (Poor) = 1.00
D- = 0.67
F + (Fail) = 0.00
F (Fail) = 0.00

16. Teaching Evaluation Procedures

Faculty Document 2019 outlines the policies regarding teaching evaluations. The policy states that all departments/instructional units will conduct end-of-the-semester student evaluations in every section of every course, including summer session courses. The Department of Kinesiology distributes teaching evaluations to instructors prior to the last week of class. Off campus instructors will be mailed course evaluations for distribution in class. Instructors are asked to allow students time during one of the final class periods to complete the instructor/course evaluations. Instructors should assign a student the responsibility of returning the course evaluations to the Department Office. Complete instructions accompany the evaluation forms.

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DROP POLICY

A student may drop a course(s) with written approval of the instructor or the department through the end of the eighth week of classes. One factor in students' decisions to drop courses might be their perception of course performance. Instructors are encouraged to provide some form of feedback to each student within the first eight weeks of classes enabling them to realistically assess their progress. In addition, instructors are reminded that grade progress reports are to be completed for Freshmen at the midterm grade report. 


WITHDRAWAL

Withdrawal is the formal termination of a student's complete registration in all courses in a given semester. Withdrawal does not imply a prohibition against re-entry in future semesters if the student is in good academic standing at the time of withdrawal. All students who withdraw after the first day of classes will automatically receive registration materials for the next semester. All students who withdraw prior to the first day of classes must file a re-entry application except when withdrawing from the summer term. Non-attendance does not constitute withdrawal. Withdrawals are not accepted by telephone; if you withdraw by mail, the postmark date will be used.

1. To withdraw before classes begin: the student must complete the reverse side of the Student Schedule, sign and date it, and bring it to the Department of Enrollment Services or send a letter via Certified Mail to the Department of Enrollment Services giving notice of withdrawal (including student number). This notice of withdrawal must be received in the Department of Enrollment Services by dates printed in the Schedule of Classes each semester to avoid being charged for withdrawing.

2. To withdraw after classes begin: Students may withdraw in the College of Health Sciences Student Services Office (END 810). The withdrawal becomes effective on the date the withdrawal notice is received. (Withdrawals cannot be taken by telephone; if received by mail, the postmark date is used.) This date determines the amount of fee-tuition that will be assessed. Check the Schedule of Classes to determine the effect of withdrawal on fees.

Undergraduate students attempting to withdraw after the eighth week of classes during the regular semester may do so only for reasons of extraordinary circumstances not related to academic performance in their courses. In order to withdraw after the eighth week, the student must first file a written appeal with their assigned academic advisor. The student is then required to appear before the College of Health Sciences Academic Appeals Committee to present the case. Only if the Committee approves the appeal will a withdrawal be permitted.

All courses from which a student withdraws after the 4th week of class during the regular semester will remain on the student's permanent record and will be reflected on the transcript with the "W" (Withdrawal) symbol. W is not computed in a student's grade point average.

Different guidelines pertain to summer sessions. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for further information.

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ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

1. Undergraduate Student Admission

The Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology degree is based on two years of college work in pre-kinesiology, followed by two years of study in a specific submajor. Potential applicants should consult the academic advisor in the College of Health Sciences Advising Office (END 810) for current information.

New Freshmen. Admission of freshmen into the College of Health Sciences is granted to students who fulfill the UWM admission standards. New freshmen interested in pursuing a Kinesiology degree are admitted into one of the Kinesiology submajors. Pre-Kinesiology and Pre-Physical Therapy students who meet core requirements and GPA requirements will advance to the major in Kinesiology.

Transfer Students. Students seeking to transfer to the School with less than 56 transfer credits will be admitted into the Pre-Kinesiology classification if they meet the UWM admission requirements for transfer.

Applicants with 56 or more transfer credits will be admitted directly to a major if a review of their academic record indicates that they meet the admission criteria for the specific submajor requested (see Advancement to a Major).

Students from two-year institutions (community colleges and UW Centers) are limited to the transfer of up to 70 credits required for the bachelor degree.

2. Program Modifications

Many times students wish to modify their programs of study. This generally occurs when a specific course is no longer offered or when the student changes the focus of his/her major.

Program modifications must be approved prior to enrolling in the course. They must also be consistent with the normal credit requirements of the program of study.

The steps for a successful program modification follow:

A. The student along with his/her academic advisor identify appropriate courses for the modified program.

B. The student discusses the change with the academic advisor and together, complete a Program Modification Form.

C. The completed form is submitted to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator for review and approval. If the proposal is new, it is taken to the Department of Kinesiology Course and Curriculum Committee for approval.

3. Course Waivers in the Undergraduate Program

Course waivers may be appropriate where both the student and either the course professor or Undergraduate Program Coordinator agree that a particular course or courses in the undergraduate program would be repetitious based on the student's previous academic work. Other appropriate courses must be substituted for the waived course(s) in such circumstances.

4. Advancement to a Major

Pre-Kinesiology (PKIN) and Pre-Physical Therapy (PPHT) students are promoted after completing all of the following requirements.

A. Complete at least 58 credits and obtain junior standing, which includes successful completion of the Mathematics and English Composition Requirements. (Non-GER students -- those students who completed at least one college course as a degree student prior to Fall 1986 -will be allowed to complete the old English Composition requirement.)

B. The student must obtain a grade of "C" or better in:

600-105 Intermediate Algebra
204-202 Anatomy & Physiology I
204-203 Anatomy & Physiology II
820-101 Introduction to Psychology
900-101 Introduction to Sociology

C. The student must have an overall GPA of 2.5,

D. The student must have successfully completed the appropriate group of pre-professional core course requirements as designated within the program description for the given submajor.

Students are promoted prior to the start of each semester. If an oversight occurs, students are asked to contact their academic advisor to review their promotion status.

5. Admission to Internship

As part of the undergraduate degree requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology (Exercise and Fitness), an internship experience is required. This requirement can only be met by the completion of a 16-week, 40-hour per week work-study experiential program upon completion of all undergraduate course work requirements as specified by the Department of Kinesiology. Students in the Athletic Training and Kinesiology submajors may complete the internship experience as described above, or over two consecutive semesters. In the latter case, the internship experience would typically be a 20-hour per week commitment over the two semesters.

The following requirements must be met before enrolling in the Kinesiology Internship and Seminar (HUM KIN 489):

A. Senior standing,

B. Classified in the major (KIN),

C. Completion of all curriculum requirements including General Education Requirements, Pre-Professional and Professional Core Requirements, and electives,

D. A cumulative GPA of 2.5,

E. A GPA of 2.75 in all Human Kinetics (HUM KIN ) courses listed in the junior and senior years,

F. Upon successful completion of the internship program, must be immediately eligible for graduation and in good academic standing,

G. Verification of 320 hours of post-high school paid or volunteer experience in the recreation, exercise/fitness, athletic training field, or related areas. This requirement applies only to students pursuing the Exercise and Fitness, Health and Fitness Management, and Athletic Training submajors. Hours counted toward the 320-hour fieldwork requirement cannot be obtained as part of a course or laboratory requirement.

In addition, the following two criteria must be met by students pursuing the two semester internship in Kinesiology or Athletic Training:

A. Must be within 32 credit hours of graduation (including internship credits),

B. May be limited to 9 credits of coursework each semester while completing internship requirements.

NOTE: For students pursuing an undergraduate degree in the kinesiology submajor, the internship is optional and may be replaced by the completion of an additional 14 credits of correlate course work. Kinesiology students interested in pursuing a research internship should meet with the Clinical Coordinator during their junior year.

6. Graduation Requirements

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology. The following requirements must be met to graduate:

A. Completion of 128 degree credits for the Kinesiology and Athletic Training submajors, or 131 degree credits for the Exercise and Fitness and Health and Fitness Management submajors.

B. Cumulative UWM GPA of 2.5.

C. A GPA of 2.75 in all Kinesiology courses listed in the junior and senior years, including Kinesiology Internship and Seminar (HUM KIN 489).

All UWM students who are subject to the GER and those that entered UWM in Fall 1989 or later must complete 3 credits pertaining to the study of the life experiences of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, or Asian Americans.

Students must earn their last 30 credits at UWM.

Graduation Honors. In addition to the University commencement honors, the College of Health Sciences awards final honors to undergraduate students if they have an overall grade point average of 3.5 on all UWM work, with a minimum of 60 graded credits. These honors are printed on a student's permanent record with the following designations: Cum Laude -- cumulative GPA of 3.50 or above; Magna Cum Laude -- cumulative GPA of 3.65 or above; Summa Cum Laude -- cumulative GPA of 3.80 or above. The College of Health Sciences also recognizes outstanding academic achievement by placing undergraduate students on the Dean's List. Kinesiology students who earn a 3.5 or higher grade point average on 12 or more graded UWM credits, during a Fall, Spring, or Summer semester, will make the Dean's Honor List. 

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STUDENT CONDUCT
Academic Misconduct

The University has a responsibility to insure academic honesty and integrity and to develop procedures to deal effectively with instances of academic dishonesty. Students are responsible for the honest completion and representation of their work, for the appropriate citation of sources, and for respect of others' academic endeavors.

Academic misconduct is an act in which a student seeks to claim credit for the work or efforts of another without authorization or citation, uses unauthorized materials or fabricated data in any academic exercise, forges or falsifies academic documents or records, intentionally impedes or damages the academic work of others, engages in conduct aimed at making false representation of a student's academic performance, or assists other students in any of these acts. Prohibited conduct includes cheating on an examination; collaborating with others in work to be presented, contrary to the stated rules of the course; submitting a paper or assignment as one's own work when a part of all of the paper or assignment is the work of another; submitting a paper or assignment that contains ideas or research of others without appropriately identifying the sources of those ideas; stealing examinations or course materials; submitting, if contrary to the rules of a course, work previously presented in another course; tampering with the laboratory experiment or computer program of another student; knowingly and intentionally assisting another student in any of the above, including assistance an arrangement whereby any work, classroom performance, examination or other activity is submitted or performed by a person other than the student under whose name the work is submitted or performed.

University policy prohibits and punishes misconduct. Students who engage in academic misconduct are subject to a range of sanctions including, but not limited to: a failing grade on an assignment or test, a failing grade in the course, and expulsion from the university.

It is in keeping with our educational goals that academic integrity be constantly reinforced and that breaches to that integrity be sanctioned. We suggest a number of steps for all faculty and instructional staff to take in establishing and maintaining standards of academic integrity.

Prevent incidences of academic misconduct. State in your syllabus and throughout the course that academic misconduct is not tolerated. Clarify for students what actions in your course would be considered to be academic misconduct. When administering examinations, ensure that students are properly proctored; use seating arrangements and/or multiple test forms to prevent cheating. Make your written assignments specific to your course materials so that "canned" term papers-now plentiful via the Web-will not be appropriate.

When incidences of academic misconduct are detected or suspected, take action in accord with the University policies (UWS Chapter 14/UWM Faculty Document 1686). While you may be tempted to "work out a deal" with students who cheat in your class, if you do so without notifying the student of her/his right to appeal and/or apply sanctions that are not allowable under University policy, the University would not support your action should it be subsequently challenged by the student. If you do not have a copy of the UWM Academic Misconduct Guide for Instructors, please contact the Assistant Dean brondino@uwm.edu.

Before you proceed, contact the Investigating Officer for the College of Health Sciences. Investigating officers are designated to assist faculty and instructional academic staff in dealing with suspected academic misconduct, and will work with you in deciding appropriate sanctions to recommend. Should the student appeal the allegation and/or sanction recommended, I would work with you in preparing for the hearing. Fewer than 1 out of 10 students accused of academic misconduct chooses to appeal.

Detailed rules and procedures must be followed in cases of academic misconduct. When an instructor believes that a student enrolled in his or her course has committed an act of academic misconduct, the instructor is urged to contact Assistant Dean Kate Brondino who is the School's Investigating Officer (END 810 or 229-4806).


Disruptive Student Conduct

The problem of a disruptive student is one that can best be handled by a joint effort of the teacher and the Office of the Dean of Students. If a student is behaving in a disruptive manner in class, the faculty member should speak privately to that student and clarify exactly what is expected concerning behavior in the classroom. If the disruptive behavior continues, don't wait - call the Office of the Dean of Students and ask to speak to Dean James Hill. There are important reasons for this early contact. The Dean wants to be able to assist and advise instructors so that their handling of the situation is correct. Also, we do not want the behavior and attendant frustration and anxiety to escalate to a critical point, especially considering that disciplinary action necessitates several steps. In addition, the Office of the Dean of Students regularly receives reports of problematic behavior and keeps records of disciplinary actions and may have knowledge of the student in question if he or she has engaged in disruptive behavior in the past. In these instances those who have encountered the student before may have helpful information and advice to contribute. Of course, if the behavior of the student is severe from the outset, the teacher should contact the Office of the Dean of Students immediately to seek assistance rather than make an attempt to counsel the student privately. Further, the UWM Police can be called to assist faculty who need help in addressing disruptive behavior when it occurs.

The integrity and smooth operation of the classroom are to be protected. These procedures and resources are designed to achieve that result. If you have any questions regarding these procedures, call 229-4632.

These procedures are spelled out in more detail in Policy S-9 of the Selected Academic and Administrative Policies booklet which is available in each academic department office and from the Secretary of the University. 

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ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT DRUGS

The most widely abused drug on a college campus is alcohol. The University of Wisconsin System and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee prohibit the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on university property or as part of university activities. Employees who are convicted of any criminal drug statute violation occurring in the work place must notify the dean, director or department chair within five days of the conviction, if the employees are employed by the university at the time of the conviction.

The distribution of a controlled substance to a minor can lead to the doubling of an authorized sentence term (Sec. 161.46(1) Stats). Wisconsin has a formidable legal sanction that restricts the use of alcohol in various situations. It is illegal to procure for sale, dispense or give away alcohol to anyone who has not reached the legal drinking age of 21 years (Sec. 125.07(1)(a)(1) Stats).

The Federal government has penalties against illicit drug use and a person can be sentenced for up to six years for the unlawful possession of an illegal controlled substance. This includes the distribution of a small amount of Marijuana (less than 250 grams). If a controlled substance can cause death or bodily injury a person could receive a sentence of life imprisonment. Possession of cocaine (more than 5 grams) can result in a penalty of 10-16 years in prison, U.S.S.F.s. 2D2.1(b)(a).

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SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS
Participation by Students with Disabilities

If any student is in need of special accommodations in order to meet any of the requirements of any course offered by the Department of Kinesiology, please contact the instructor of that course, or the department chairperson to discuss accommodations.


Accommodations for Religious Observances

From time to time, students who are observing religious holidays or other days of special religious significance will find it necessary to be absent on a class day. While it is undoubtedly impossible to avoid the scheduling of tests and other major activities on all days corresponding to religious observances, Wisconsin law (Chapter 36.43) and UWM Faculty Policy (Document 1918) require that we provide "reasonable accommodation of a student's sincerely held religious beliefs with regard to all examinations and other academic requirements." Please make every effort to accommodate students who face conflicts between their academic responsibilities and religious commitments.

It is the policy of the board of regents that students' sincerely held religious beliefs shall be reasonably accommodated with respect to all examinations and other academic requirements. The Board of Regents adopts this chapter in order to ensure that all institutions of the University of Wisconsin system have in place appropriate mechanisms for ensuring the reasonable accommodation of students' sincerely held religious beliefs, and for appeals related to these matters.


Accommodation of religious beliefs:
  • A student shall be permitted to make up an examination or other academic requirement at another time or by an alternative method, without any prejudicial effect, where:

A. There ' is a scheduling conflict between the students sincerely held religious beliefs and taking the examination or meeting the academic requirements; and

B. the student has notified the instructor, within the first three weeks of the beginning of classes (within the first week of summer session and short courses), of the specific days or dates on which he or she will request relief ftom an examination or academic requirement.

  • Instructors may schedule a make-up examination or other- academic requirement before or, after the regularly scheduled examination or other academic requirement.
  • Instructors shall accept, at face value, the sincerity of students' religious beliefs.
  • Student notification of instructors and requests for relief under sub. (1) shall be kept confidential.
  • Complaints of failure to provide reasonable accommodation of a student's sincerely held religious beliefs as required by this rule may be filed under UWM Complaint and Grievance Procedures.
  • The Chancellor shall, through appropriate institutional publications (to include at a minimum the Schedule of Classes and Bulletin), provide notification to students and instructors of the rules for accommodation of religious beliefs, and of the procedure and appropriate office for filing complaints. 
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AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/ HARASSMENT

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution, and does not discriminate in any of its education or employment practices, policies, or procedures on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, disability, or any other protected status recognized by Wisconsin or federal law. In further compliance with these laws and regulations, the University prohibits harassment and retaliation against complainants on any of these bases. Sexual harassment is reprehensible and will not be tolerated by the University. It subverts the mission of the University and threatens the careers, educational experience, and well being of students, faculty, and staff. The University will not tolerate behavior between or among members of the University community, which creates an unacceptable environment.

Questions about the application of any or these policies may be directed to the appropriate admitting or employing office, or to the campus Office of Equal Opportunity Programs, Chapman Hall, Room 310.


Complaint Procedures

Students should direct complaints to the head of the academic unit or department in which the incident occurred. If the incident allegedly violates a specific university policy, the complaint may be directed to the head of the department or academic unit in which the incident occurred or to the appropriate university office responsible for enforcing the policy. 

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DISCRIMINATION

In April of 1990, the Wisconsin legislature enacted Statute, 36.12, which prohibit discrimination against students in the University of Wisconsin System. This statute states "that no student may be denied admission, participation or benefits or be discriminated against in any service, program, course or facility of the system or its institutions or Center because of the Students race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, disability, ancestry, age, sexual orientation, pregnancy, marital status or parental status." 


SEXUAL ASSAULT

As an UWM instructor you are required to report any sexual assault that you are a witness to. According to Section 36.11(21) (c) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Any cases that you are a part of in any way must be kept confidential. 


STUDENT ACADEMIC APPEALS

A student may appeal an academic action to the appropriate person or committee. An appeal is a request for an exception to an established policy or rule. The content of each appeal is carefully reviewed in order to reach a decision. Appeals should follow the established guidelines. For more information on filing an appeal, contact the Undergraduate Program Coordinator (END 413).

1. Appeals of Academic Regulations and Standards

Undergraduate student appeals are reviewed by either the School's academic advisor and/or Undergraduate Program's Committee structure. Students are advised in writing of the decision. The faculty and staff consider individual cases concerning the degree requirements and other academic rules and regulations established by the College of Health Sciences and the Department of Kinesiology.

2. Grade Appeal Procedures

A student may appeal a grade on the grounds that it is based on a capricious or arbitrary decision of the course instructor. Such an appeal shall follow the established steps outlined below.

STEP 1: Initial appeal must be made directly with instructor within 15 days of receiving final course grade. Instructor will review with student grading process and rationale for submitted grade.

STEP 2: If the student is still dissatisfied, student may continue the appeal by submitting a written statement of appeal within 10 days of the student/instructor meeting to the Department of Kinesiology Course and Curriculum Committee. The appeal should include rational for disputing grade and evidence of discrepancy. The Course and Curriculum Committee will convene a meeting to hear the student's case and review the grade and grading process. The student will be informed of the Committee's decision.

STEP 3: If the student is still dissatisfied, the student may continue the appeal process by requesting that the Course and Curriculum Committee forward the student's letter and documentation to the Department Chairperson within 10 days of receiving the Committee's decision. The Department Chairperson will convene a meeting of the Department of Kinesiology Executive Committee to review the student's case. The student may submit additional material, and may be present to plead his/her case. The student will be informed of the Executive Committee's decision after deliberation.

STEP 4: If the student is still dissatisfied, the student may appeal to the Scholastic Appeals Committee (CHS Faculty/Student Affairs Committee) within 10 working days from the date of receiving the Executive Committee's decision. If the Committee concludes that the student's grade was based on arbitrary or capricious grounds, it shall recommend to the Dean that the grade be changed. The Dean has the authority to implement the recommendation as per Faculty Document 1243.

STEP 5: If the Scholastic Appeals Committee fails to recommend a grade change, the student may appeal to the Dean within 10 working days from the date of the Scholastic Appeals Committee's decision. The Dean's decision is final. 

3. Undergraduate Grievance/Appeal Procedure (other than for grades)

STEP 1: In cases concerning academic matters other than grades (admission, course substitutions, etc.), the student must file the grievance/appeal within 30 working days from the date of the action that prompted the grievance/appeal. Where the grievance/appeal involves the course being taught, the student will appeal to the course instructor. The student who has a grievance/appeal that does not concern an academic matter will go immediately to Step 2, within the 30-day time limit referred to above.

STEP 2: If dissatisfied with the Step 1 decision, the student may appeal to the program coordinator within 10 days from the date of the Step 1 decision. If still dissatisfied, the student proceeds to Step 3.

STEP 3: The student meets with the department chairperson within 10 working days from the date of the Step 2 decision. If still dissatisfied with the decision, the student proceeds to Step 4.

STEP 4: The student may appeal to the Scholastic Appeals Committee within 10 working days from the date of the Step 3 decision.

STEP 5: If the student is dissatisfied with the decision of the Scholastic Appeals Committee, the student may appeal to the Dean within 10 working days from the date of the Scholastic Appeals Committee's decision. The Dean's decision is final.

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SECTION II:
Course Administration

EXPECTATIONS OF INSTUCTOR
Attendance at Class

A. Arrive to class on time and stay for the duration of the class period. It is a good practice to arrive to class at least 10 minutes early to insure room is properly set up, materials and equipment are available, etc.

B. If you know in advance that you must miss class (in order of administrative preference);

1. Obtain an approved substitute for the class (see letter "D" below, OR)

2. Include date of class period which must be canceled in your syllabus and do not hold class that day, or,

3. Notify class in advance of class cancellation.

C. If you must miss class at late notice, due to illness or emergency, contact Wendy Pribbanow, University Services Program Associate for the Department of Kinesiology at 229-6080.

D. Any person substituting for class must be pre-approved by Barbara Meyer, Department Chair.

E. If there are any class cancellations due to the weather, listen to WTMJ Radio 620 AM for official word on class cancellations, or call the SNO-JOKE hotline at 229-4444.

Course/Instructor Policies and Procedures

A. A typed syllabus is required for each section (class) you teach. Copies can be typed and photocopied by the Kinesiology student secretaries if given to the Program Assistant in a timely manner (preferably 3-4 days before they are needed). A current syllabus should be provided to class members and to the undergraduate program coordinator each semester. (See later section on contents/procedures for the syllabus.)

B. Turn in all grade reports and office correspondence according to directions listed on materials and within the time frame listed. Return phone calls as soon as possible. Instructors of freshman will be requested to provide grades for a midterm grade report.

C. Take attendance at every class period. Do not use blank attendance sheets. This does not enable you to get to know the names of your students, and it is possible for them to sign in their friends who, in actuality, may not be in attendance.

D. Follow all emergency procedures as indicated in this handbook.


COURSE SYLLABUS

Each instructor is expected to prepare a course syllabus for each class they teach. A copy should be kept on file with the Undergraduate Program Coordinator EACH SEMESTER.

IT IS REQUIRED that course syllabus be handed out at the FIRST CLASS.

The following is a list of required topics that should be covered in your syllabus (put in information as indicated below into your syllabus):

*********************************

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE
Department of Kinesiology

Spring Semester, 2000-2001

Course: Title, Course Numbers

Day/Time: MW 8:30-9:20am

Location: Klotsche Center Weight Room

Instructor Name: Bill Smith, Ad Hoc Instructor ("ad hoc" means part-time)

Office Phone: Klotsche Center Information Center 229-5287 (you may also add your home phone-optional)

Department Phone: Department of Kinesiology 229-6080

Office Hours: You can put times you are on campus here or "By Appointment"-make sure to BE THERE during those times!

Course Objective(s):

What are the objectives of the course? It is best to have 2-3 objectives minimum. Objectives should cover general knowledge base and the skills that will be covered. Make sure that lessons reflect the learning of thee objectives.

Grading:

Include percentages that any quizzes or exams will count (i.e., "80% grading based on participation/attendance: 20% on one final quiz on lifting techniques/cross-training rules…) It is recommended to grade by active participation rather than mere attendance, and to add at least one cognitive measure (i.e., quiz, test, etc.).

An acceptable attendance grading system An acceptable attendance grading system is

0-1 absence =A 2 absences-A- 3 absences =B+ 4 absences =B 5 absences =B- 6 absences =C+ 7 absences =C 8 absences =C- 9 absences =D+ 10 absences =D 11 absences =D- 12 absences =Fail

It is not appropriate for Sport & Recreation Instructors to assign research papers, unless using it to make up for attendance problems. See the Undergraduate Program Coordinator or Department Chair for questions about grading.

Tardiness Policy:

Generally, unless there are special circumstances, students should be ready to participate no later than 10 minutes into the class period. It is acceptable to grade an individual down 1 grade (1/2 grade) when they have 2 unexcused tardies of 10 minutes or more. Care should be taken to attempt to find a compromise for individuals who have classes on the other side of campus.

Leaving Class Early:

Students should be permitted to leave 5 minutes early without penalty if they have problems getting to their next class because of clothing-changing/showering.

Make-up classes:

If possible, offer 1-2 make-up classes where attendance is voluntary.

Special Accommodations:

Individuals with disabilities and/or health conditions that may affect full participation in this course should contact the instructor during the first week of classes. This information is PRIVATE.

Religious Holidays:

Students may miss classes without penalty due to religious holiday practices.

Final Exams:

Sport and Recreation classes are exempt from final exams and if one is given it should be given during the regular scheduled class time and not during exam week.

*****************************

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TEACHING PRINCIPLES

Learn all students’ names as soon as possibleLearn all students’ names as soon as possible. Do not abbreviate their names. Attempt to get correct annunciation (sound) of their names. Do not attempt to "Americanize" a name that you are unfamiliar with: ask the student how to pronounce his/her name correctly if you are unsure (do not be shy in doing this!)

Treat all students as your customers Treat all students as your customers - with dignity and respect. Refer problem situations to the Undergraduate Program Coordinator first, and them to the Chair of the Department of Kinesiology if needed.

Give clear and concise instructions to students. Whenever possible, put industry standards, procedures, and safety procedures in writing to students. Do not compromise on safety at any time. (Example: it is incorrect to do any lifting with the back; keep you back straight and with bent knees, lift the designated object or weight…). Whenever possible, put industry standards, procedures, and safety procedures in writing to students. Do not compromise on safety at any time. (Example: it is incorrect to do any lifting with the back; keep you back straight and with bent knees, lift the designated object or weight…)

…. Give all instructions twice for clarity….

Make adaptations to individual student needs based on disability. Permit students who miss class, due to the observance of a religious holiday to miss class without penalty by making up work if needed.

Use proper planning skills when teaching you classes. Prepare a block plan (outline of what skills information that will be covered across the entire semester) and Lesson Plans (skills and information that will be concerned within class periods).

Include essential elements of activities by planning each class period to have the following elements and/or time allotments:

Attendance -- 3 minutes
Stretching & Warm-up -- 5-8 minutes minimum
Skill Review & Practice -- approximately 40-50 %
New Skill Introduction & Practice -- approximately 50%
Simulated practice & drills -- Games*

NOTE: League play or games should only take up about of class time… Spend more time on games after novice skills are introduced.

(* These elements may not be applicable to classes such as aerobics, step aerobics, or water aerobics classes)

Give individual and group feedback Give individual and group feedback that is immediate and specific.

A. Focus on how to improve skills, rather than on what is being done incorrectly. (Example: "Karen, your jump for that jump shout was off-balance. See if you can jump a little more straight-up rather then leaning forward.")

B. Use concrete cues as often as possible. (Example: "Earl, you left arm needs to be right next to you ear when you reach forward on your front crawl arm. You had it reaching to the left too far.")

C. Give encouragement when something is done correctly.(Example: "Willie, I like the way you covered Helena on defense. She almost caused a fast break, which you were able to prevent.")

D. Give learners something to visualize when they are thinking of how to move correctly. (Example: " Natasha, when you try to do the breaststroke kick, imagine that you are trying to squeeze a big, red balloon so that it breaks.")

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FULL-SPEED SPARING

Maintain a safe and suitable learning environment. It is the policy of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee that sparring with partners in a martial arts class shall never be done at full speed, even when there is appropriate protective gear being worn by both partners. Sparring at a slow, controlled speed, is permitted, provided that it is done at a safe distance, so that no contact is made. Any accidental contact should be made only under controlled circumstances (slow practice), or in a simulation-type situation, when class participants are wearing appropriate protective gear. 


COURSE ROSTER

A computerized roster will be provided to you prior to the start of your first class. The following information is on this roster:

  • Student name, ID Number, Telephone Number, Address, Classification.
  • All courses are designated by a Department code followed by a three-digit course number; the department code for the Department of Kinesiology classes are either "HUM KIN" or "SPT&REC"; your course number is something like…"HUM KIN 114". All courses also have section numbers for multiple classes held at differing times.  Always refer to your course and section number where appropriate (i.e., Tennis I, SPT&REC 114 sec. 001).  All courses also have section numbers for multiple classes held at differing times. 
  • Note number of people you can have in your class by observing the "Seats Filled" and "Seats Remaining" number at the bottom. See the Undergraduate Program Coordinator about whether you can add more students into your class beyond the number indicated as you maximum (if applicable). This may usually be done if there is enough room in the class (i.e., enough equipment, mats, machines, court space, racquets, etc.).
  • Note where individuals have already dropped ("D") or withdrawn from school ("W") when trying to determine who is actually in the class.

Class record books are available for keeping attendance records. See the Department of Kinesiology Program Assistant to obtain one.

It is against UWM and FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 1974) to give out information to individuals (including parents or spouses) without prior written consent. DO NOT POST GRADES BY ID NUMBER, or assign a numerical number to post grades. 

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WAITING LISTS AND DROPPING STUDENTS

The Department of Kinesiology has the policy of dropping individuals who do not show up for the first two days of classes (without prior consent of the instructor). If an individual does not attend the first week of classes and you have people on the waiting list, you may add those on the waiting list to your class.

Keep accurate attendance records at all times.

The Department of Kinesiology Program Assistant will put a memo in your mailbox with appropriate forms for you to fill out regarding this non-attendance policy.

A Student may drop a course with written approval of the instructor or the department through the end of the eighth week of classes. 


ADDING AND DROPPING PROCEDURES

A copy of an "add/drop form" is provided in the Appendix (Page 2). These forms should be filled out by the student and brought to you for a signature. Generally, a "drop" can be signed by the department OR the instructor, but an "add" must be signed by the instructor.

  • Make sure to sign for the correct course on the add sheet.
  • Sign & date add form under "instructor/department signature".
  • Return form to the student to turn in to the Registrar’s Office. They keep all copies to turn in to the registrar-you do NOT get a copy of this form.
  • Add student (name, ID#, phone number) to your roster.
  • Updated rosters are usually only dispensed 2-3 times per semester. Do not be surprised if you do not receive an update right away.

Audit Students - auditors are individuals taking a class for the enrichment or enjoyment. They do not receive credit. Allow persons taking the course for credit to add first; then, after you’ve determined that you have room, you may add the auditor (s). (They also receive ID cards). - auditors are individuals taking a class for the enrichment or enjoyment. They do not receive credit. Allow persons taking the course for credit to add first; then, after you’ve determined that you have room, you may add the auditor (s). (They also receive ID cards).

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USE OF PAWS

During the first two weeks of school PAWS is still operational and students can use this to add or drop a class without coming and getting a signature or a stamp from you or to a staff member in the department.

  • If you wish to by-pass the PAWS system and override a year in school or capacity restriction a signature is needed.
  • After the first two weeks students will need to obtain signatures for adds or drops.

As an instructor you can obtain current class lists from the web at http://www4.uwm.edu/uits/datadmin/WordDocs/Enrollments/Course_enrollment_menu.html or from the Alpha computer during the first two weeks. Neither will be up to the minute but they will reflect the previous day’s transactions.

If you want to control access to prohibit students from adding via PAWS you can do this by notifying the Undergraduate Program Coordinator or Department of Kinesiology Program Assistant who will process this request.

To download class lists to your personal computer call Tony Giaimo at x5060.

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SECTION III:
Use of Klotsche Center and Engelmann Gym Policies and Procedures

ROOM ASSIGNMENTS
Teaching Assignment in Klotsche Center for Physical Activity (KCPE)

If assigned to teach in the Klotsche Center, check your assigned mailbox daily at Klotsche Center Information Center for messages and information.

A. Show your Klotsche Center Affiliate Membership Card each time you enter the building. You may use the facilities during regular building hours (regular Klotsche Center rules and equipment fees apply) with this card.

B. If Building keys are needed, contact Steven Mohar to obtain keys. You will need to:

1. Sign key authorization form indicating reason keys are needed.

2. Return keys to the Assistant Director after annual work term has been completed (or immediately upon termination)

3. Maintain responsibility of keys. Keys are not to be given to students.

4. Agree to use keys as assigned for class work only.

C. Follow Klotsche Center administrative procedures

1. Students must show valid ID cards to enter Klotsche Center every day. (ID cards are not needed at Engelmann Gym).

2. Each student receives 2 "free" entries without his/her ID card. After that, the individual will be denied entry unless instructor is willing to come to the Information

3. No black soled shoes or street shoes allowed in racquetball courts or on arena wood floor.

4. No hanging on basketball rims.

5. No gym bags in the weight room.

6. All rules as stated in this year’s Klotsche Center Handbook must be followed.

7. Participants must be in workout attire to participate.

8. No open toed shoes in weight room during class.

9. No food allowed in the building. Beverages are only permitted in reusable plastic drink cups or sport bottles (covered); no glass, cans, or Styrofoam cups.

10. Report hazardous or dangerous environmental conditions immediately to the Assistant Director.

Teaching Assignment in Engelmann Gym

If assign to teach in Englemann Gym:

A. Lockers are available for semester use at Engelmann Gym. At this time, there is no charge for use. Small half lockers ONLY may be used for one semester. Individuals must provide their own locks. Neither UWM nor the Department of Kinesiology is responsible for lost, stolen, or damaged personal locks or items.

B. All doors in the gym should be locked after use, unless there is a class or other "officially" scheduled activity in the gym. If you are unsure, contact the Klotsche Center Information Center at x3914.

C. Make sure the cage and music closet is locked after each use (if applicable).

D. Report the following conditions immediately to the Assistant Director (x5209):

1. When equipment is in need of repair, unorganized or has been vandalized.

2. If there are light outages or electrical outlets that are not working.

3. If the gym is dirty or the floor needs sweeping.

4. If there are any large pieces of equipment in the way or that can potentially cause injury to participants.

5. Any potentially dangerous situation.

E. If there is an EMERGENCY, follow the Emergency Action Plan (EAP) enclosed.


Teaching Assignment in Off-Campus Facility

A. Arrive for the first class 15 minutes prior to start. Introduce yourself to building supervisor.

B. Insure room is adequately prepared.

C. Post signage providing directions to room (if deemed necessary) to avoid confusion among students.

D. Report any problems to Mike Hauer, Continuing Education at 229-4714. 

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EQUIPMENT-Students

Lockers are available for students on a 1-or 2-semester basis (2 semester lockers are available for fall & spring semesters). The lockers assigned are the small cubicles (there are also a limited number of full-length lockers available for rental on a YEARLY basis).

Rental includes a lock and a cubicle locker; the larger daily lockers can be used while the students are here for class/workout, but all items must be returned to small rented cubicles overnight. Fees for lockers are listed at the Information Center. Locks may also be rented for the day.

Students can use daily (1/2 size or full size) lockers for no charge, but locks cannot be left on daily lockers overnight. Fees will be assessed and locks cut-off for any (including rented locks) locks being left on daily (i.e., non-rented) lockers. Refer students to this year's Klotsche Center Handbook for information on all building fees and policies.

Equipment used for class may be checked out for free (class only); students must complete a checkout slip with ID card. Mark "Class" on top of the checkout slip. 


EQUIPMENT-Instructors

As an ad hoc instructor (part-time), you are eligible to receive a locker, the size and location depending on availability and instructor need. Lockers must be cleared upon completion of teaching assignment or immediately upon termination of employment. Equipment for classes is stored in the arena, the Klotsche Equipment Room, or in storage areas in Engelmann Gym.

  • New tennis balls are not provided for tennis classes. Class members should bring one new can of tennis balls for the semester class. This should be included in the syllabus.
  • Smaller dumbbells and extension-type weights are kept in a cabinet in the weight room or at the Klotsche Center Equipment Room.
  • Stereo equipment is kept either with the supervisor on duty at Klotsche, or in the Music Closet in Engelmann Gym.
  • Equipment used outside of class must be rented (standard fees apply) and checked out with proper ID card.
  • A video player (VHS), monitor, and overhead projector are available for use in the building. To request use of the VCR and/or overhead projector, contact the equipment room manager. To ensure availability, make requests at least 1-2 weeks in advance so other arrangements can be made when time conflicts exist. 
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EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

All instructors of physical activity courses are encouraged to have current emergency first aid and adult CPR training. Follow procedures established in the EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN.

  • You are expected to act in a professional manner in dealing with any injury and /or illness.
  • You are expected to act in the best interest of the injured student/participant
  • You are expected to stop any play or activity that has the potential of harming or causing injury to a student or participant.
  • You are expected to keep all illness/injury information private, and for the use of UWM administration or emergency medical personnel only. 

EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN: KLOTSCHE CENTER
KLOTSCHE CENTER

If you question the seriousness of any injury, treat it as life-threatening.

A. Tend to the injury.

B. Have a student from class get or call the supervisor on duty, (x3914)

C. Treat injuries as follows:

1. Bleeding: Put on gloves and mask to avoid blood/body fluid exposure. Stop bleeding by covering with sterile gauze or bandage, apply pressure, and elevate. Treat for shock.

2. Sprain/Strain: Put gloves on to avoid blood/body fluid exposure. Apply ice pack (get from supervisor on duty) to affected area for not more than 15 minutes. Elevate affected body part 8-10 inches. Keep victim’s body temperature comfortable.

3. For other injuries, contact the supervisor on duty.

4. Disposal of potentially infectious materials: Dispose of all blood-tinged or body fluid-tinged of potentially materials in Red Biohazard Bag (provided by the supervisor on duty). This must be disposed of at the Klotsche Center Training Room. See the Assistant Director or Klotsche supervisor on duty for assistance.

D. Do not move victim unless in danger of further injury.

E. Do not resume class until victim has been cared for by professional or stabilized to the point that they are safe and not in danger of shock.

F. Continue to monitor injured person if they decide to sit out of further activity.

G. Ask for permission to help the injured person before treating.

H. Always suggest that medical personnel look at the injury.

1. If an individual refuses to go to hospital or medical facility, make sure that you insist-especially if they seem seriously ill or if you are unsure.

2. Many individuals refuse to go because they do not have insurance. Continue to try to persuade them to be transported to the hospital, or to go to the Norris Health Center (M-F 8:00am-4:30pm only). If they continue to refuse, make sure another person witnesses this refusal.

NOTE: Non-UWM students and faculty/staff are not eligible utilize Norris Health Center services.

3. If a person is unconscious, you must contact emergency medical personnel by calling 9-911. Consent in this case is assumed to be given.

4. If 9-911 is called the phone location that should be given is the southeast hallway.

I. The university does not cover transportation or hospital service costs for personal injuries suffered. Students/participants are advised to obtain a health insurance policy that covers accidental injury care.

J. Send a student to call 9-911 and the Supervisor on Duty @ 3914 if needed.

1. UWM University Police will respond and further assess whether an ambulance needs to be called if you know that an ambulance should be called make sure to indicate this in the 911-phone call.

2. Give:

Location
Caller’s name
Type of injury
Do not hang up until dispatcher tells caller to do so.

K. Contact the Klotsche Center Information Center (x3914) as soon as possible to notify the Assistant Director of ANY injury until ambulance arrives.

  • Treat all accident victims for shock by maintaining body temperature (do not overheat or allow to catch cold). Keep person in his/her most comfortable position, or have them lie down and elevate legs 8-10 inches if they begin to feel faint, restless, confused, etc.
  • Fill out Accident Report. This is required in any case needing first aid procedures. Turn in report to Assistant Director as soon as possible after accident occurred. Do not discuss details of the accident with anyone other than UWM officials or medical personnel.
  • Do not leave your class unattended to take person to hospital. Dismiss class if necessary.
  • Never allow an injured individual to walk home or drive home, to the hospital or leave them alone. Send another student with that person for safety, if you cannot go with them.
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EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN: ENGELMANN GYM

If you question the seriousness of any injury, treat it as life-threatening.

A. Locate the First Aid Kit, which is kept in the cage area where the steps for the aerobics class are kept (south wall of gym). Bring the entire kit to the victim.

B. Treat injuries as follows:

1. Bleeding- put on gloves and mask to avoid blood/body fluid exposure. Stop bleeding by covering with sterile gauze or bandage. Apply pressure, and elevate. Keep victim’s body temperature comfortable.

2. Sprain/Strain- put gloves on to avoid blood/body fluid exposure. Apply ice pack to affected area for not more than 15 minutes. Do not smash chemical ice packs-read all directions carefully. Elevate affected body part 8-10 inches. Keep victim’s body temperature comfortable. (Maintain at temperature appropriate to room climate)

3. Other injuries or illness - See "Sports Safety Training Manual" located in the first aid kit for easy reference. Treat as indicated, always remembering to wear gloves and eye protection in the case of potential blood and body fluid exposure.

4. Disposal of Potentially Infectious Materials - Dispose of all blood-tinged or body fluid tinged materials in red biohazard bag. This must be disposed of in the Klotsche Center Training Room. See the Assistant Director or Klotsche supervisor on duty for assistance.

C. Do not move victim unless in danger of further injury in that location.

D. Do not resume class until victim had been cared for by professional or stabilized to the point that they are safe and not in danger of shock.

E. Continue to monitor injured person if they decide to sit out of further activity.

F. Ask for permission to help the injured individual before applying first aid.

G. Always suggest that medical personnel look at the injury.

1. If an individual refuses to go to hospital or medical facility, make sure that you insist-especially if they seem seriously ill or if you are unsure.

2. Many individuals refuse to go because they do not have insurance. Continue to try to persuade them to be transported to the hospital, or to go to the Norris Health Center (M-F 8:00am-4:30pm only). If they continue to refuse, make sure another person witnesses this refusal.

NOTE: Non-UWM students and faculty/staff are not eligible utilize Norris Health Center services.

3. If a person is unconscious, you must contact emergency medical personnel by calling 9-911. Consent in this case is assumed to be given.

4. If 9-911 is called the phone location that should be given is the southeast hallway.

K. The university does not cover transportation or hospital service costs for personal injuries suffered. Students/participants are advised to obtain a health insurance policy which covers accidental injury care.

L. Send a student to call 9-911 and the Supervisor on Duty @ 3914 if needed.

1. UWM University Police will respond and further assess whether an ambulance needs to be called. If you know that an ambulance should be called, make sure to indicate this in the 911-phone call.

2. Give:

Location
Caller’s name
Type of injury
Do not hang up until dispatcher tells caller to do so.

M. Contact the Klotsche Center Information Center (x3914) as soon as possible to notify the Assistant Director of ANY injury.

N. Continue to treat/monitor individual until ambulance arrives.

  • Treat all accident victims for Schock by maintaining body temperature (do not overheat or allow to catch cold). Keep person in his/her most comfortable position, or have them lie down and elevate legs 8-10 inches if they begin to feel faint, restless, confused, etc.
  • Fill out an Accident Report. This is required any time First Aid has been administered. Turn in report to Assistant Director as soon as possible after accident occurred. Do not discuss details of the accident with anyone other than UWM officials or medical personnel.
  • Do not leave your class unattended to take person to hospital. Dismiss class if necessary.
  • Never allow an injured individual to walk home or drive home, to the hospital, or leave them alone. Send another student with that person for safety, if you cannot go with them.
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SECTION IV:
Support and Resources

AUDIO-VISUAL EQUIPMENT

If you are in need of audio-visual equipment, contact the Department of Kinesiology Program Assistant, Wendy Pribbanow at 229-6080. Wendy will make necessary arrangements for equipment delivery and pick-up for classroom usage. It is important to contact her with sufficient lead-time (at least 1-week notice) to insure availability of equipment. If you anticipate needing audio-visual equipment on a regular basis, please contact the Undergraduate Program Coordinator to arrange for a room change that will accommodate your needs.


TYPING AND DUPLICATION SERVICES

The Department of Kinesiology will attempt to accommodate the administrative tasks associated with the operation of its courses. Instructors may submit syllabi and exams for typing and duplication to the Program Assistant. Please allow one week for typing of exams and syllabi and 2-3 days for duplication jobs. Often these tasks are performed in less time, and when completed, the instructor will be notified. The Department of Kinesiology employs student workers who assist with typing and duplication of syllabi and exams. The Department makes every effort to insure the security of exams and appropriately monitors assigned tasks to students to maintain security of exams and other sensitive materials. 


BOOKS, ANTHOLOGIES, AND OTHER READING MATERIALS

The choice and use of textbooks is up to the assigned instructor. Instructors are encouraged to utilize the UWM Bookstore when placing book orders for courses. If using an anthology of materials, the instructor may utilize either Clark Graphics located on Oakland Avenue or IKON Copy Center in the UWM Union. A final option for making materials available to student is to place copies of materials on reserve at the UWM Library. The Library Reserve is located on the first floor of the east wing of the Library.  


PARKING PERMITS FOR GUEST SPEAKERS

The Department of Kinesiology encourages the use of panels and experts from the field as a mode of delivering information in the classroom. Courtesy parking is available for these individuals. Contact the Department of Kinesiology Program Assistant two weeks prior to the date of guest speaker to arrange for a parking permit. These are limited to guest speakers/presenters only. 

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INFORMATION AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES FACILITIES

I&MT offers a variety of computer facilities and services to assist faculty and students in their coursework and research. Accounts may be opened on the Unix computer system at no charge. This account provides access to electronic mail on the Internet, and associated services such as FTP, Gopher, and the World Wide Web. The same Unix system provides research tools for mathematics, statistics, and the sciences. The system is normally available for use 24 hours daily.

Over 265 PC and Macintosh computers are available 80 hours per week on the second floor of the Goida Meir Library and the second floor of the School of Business Administration building. Similar labs are run as joint ventures with the Student Association in the Union and with the Sandburg Living and Learning Center. These computer labs offer a wide variety of popular software as well as access to the central Unix system, the Library catalog, and student class schedules and grades (via the online system called SAS[). Students and faculty who have their own computers can access many of these systems from home.

Additional services available from I&MT are noncredit short courses on various topics (free or at a nominal charge); consulting assistance on computer problems by phone, e-mail, or in person; printed documentation; and discounts on the purchase of microcomputers and software. Most of these services are distributed from I&MT's student support center on the second floor of Bolton Hall. I&MT's main offices are located in Bolton Hall 574, phone 229-4616. Visit I&MT on the Internet at httpllwwwuwm.eduICSDIcsdHome.html. See page 81 for a information sheet detailing I&MT Staff Resources Supporting Instructional Technologies.


SOFTWARE (MICROCOMPUTER) USE

University policy and federal law prohibit the illegal duplication or use of computer software. There is no "fair use" exception for software.University Policy S-49.5 is reprinted below:

1. The University does not condone the illegal duplication or use of software.

2. The University legally licenses the use of software from many vendors and developers. It does not own this software or the related documentation. Unless specifically authorized by the vendor or developer, no one has a right to copy this software or documentation. Even a strict educational purpose is not reason for an exception.

3. All employees (unclassified, classified, limited-term, student or contract temporary) shall use software only in accord with the applicable license agreement. Only software used in accord with the applicable licensing agreement shall be run on University equipment.

Violations of this policy are to be reported to the supervisor/department chair or the dean/division head or the Division of Legal Affairs.

According to U.S. Copyright law, illegal reproduction of software can be subject to civil damages of as much as $100,000 and criminal penalties, including fines and imprisonment. University employees who make, acquire or use unauthorized copies of computer software shall be disciplined as appropriate under the circumstances. Such discipline may include termination.

All people using personally owned software on university computers are required to maintain ownership documentation for the software at the site where the computer is normally located and to provide such documentation upon request. 

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MULTIMEDIA CLASSROOM TRAINING AND OTHER MEDIA REQUESTS

All equipment in the new School of Business Administration classrooms, including the overhead projector, screen, VCR, and computer is controlled by the Command Console. To access this console, an access code and key are needed. Before obtaining the access code and key, proper training in the use of the equipment must be given. Please contact Professor Daniel Chew in BUS N243 to schedule a training session before the first day of class. Contact John Grozik (229-2382) or Dan Chew immediately if there are problems with any of the equipment.

Instructors who are not teaching in the Business Building and have need of video equipment should place these orders with Wendy Pribbanow in Enderis 411 at 229-6080. Please note that a lead time of one week is needed to insure availability, delivery, and set-up.


LIBRARY SERVICES

Faculty and academic staff members with teaching responsibilities may place print materials, including books or documents from the general collection, photocopies of periodical articles, or personal copies of books, on reserve for a semester by submitting a reserve request card. These cards are provided by the Library upon request and should be submitted three weeks before the beginning of each semester. Materials circulate for 2-hour, 2-day, or 7-day periods, depending upon the wishes of the instructor. In order to assure a balanced distribution of limited materials to a large number of users, there are no special loan privileges in the reserve section. For further information, inquire at the reserve desk, first floor, east wing, Goida Meir Library, or call 229-4954. Non-print materials, such as records, tapes, and slides, may be placed on reserve in the Curriculum Collection or Audio Center, second floor, east wing, Goida Meir Library, where viewing and listening equipment is available. 

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LIBRARY RESERVE MATERIALS

UPDATING CURRENT-REQUESTS: If you currently have personal copies and/or library materials on Reserve and want this material to remain on Reserve for next semester, please come to the Reserve desk in the East Win- of the Library and update your white request cards. To update your request, print the new year next to the semester line on the bottom right hand corner of the card. An "x" or a "b" is not, sufficient. The request cards are filed alphabetically by instructor name in the Reserve Catalog. We cannot accept phone requests for updating.

ALL REQUESTS NOT UPDATED BY 5:00 p.m. on the Friday before the start of the semester WILL BE TAKEN OFF RESERVE. Personal material will be returned to you through intercampus mail and library material will be returned to the collection. If you prefer that your personal material not be returned through intercampus mail, please make arrangements to pick it up at the Reserve Desk.

NEW SEMESTER REQUTESTS: New Reserve requests for each semester must be submitted at least THREE WEEKS prior to the start of the session to be processed before the start of classes. If you need to order items not currently owned by the library, orders must be placed with the Technical Services Department at least 6 weeks in advance. Please submit your requests as early as possible. If any requested materials are checked out and must be recalled, it will take longer for those items to be placed on Reserve. Request forms and instructions can be picked up at the Reserve Desk or will be mailed to you upon request. You may also use the request form available on the library home page or at URL http://www4.uwm.edu/libraries/forms/res-1.cfm.

Unlike previous years, the east wing, first floor of the library will be open to the public during the interim . You may drop off --few material during the normal hours of 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, or 9, am. - 5 p.m. Saturday.

RETRIEVING MATERIAL FROM THE STACKS: The most time-consuming aspect of processing reserve requests is actually retrieving books from the stacks and photocopying journal articles. For quickest service, we encourage you to retrieve books and copy journal articles yourself and bring them to the Circulation counter along with your completed request forms. Please inform the Circulation attendant that the items are for Reserve. Items checked out to you can be brought directly to the Reserve Desk (they will be discharged from your card).

STUDENT ACCESS TO MATERIAL ON RESERVE: A UWM ID is required for use of course material on reserve. Please remind your students that they will need to show their ID in order to use reserve items. Students who do not have ID's may obtain them in Mellencamp 274.

COPYRIGHT CONSEDERATIONS: Detailed information on the library's policy on reserve and copyright is available at the Reserve Desk. in brief, unless the material is accompanied by permission from the copyright holder(s): 1) we can place only ONE copy of a copyrighted article or book chapter on reserve; 2) an ad hoc anthology cannot be placed on reserve - each article or book chapter must be considered a separate item with a separate call number; and 3) professionally-produced videotapes must be copyrighted for public performance.

Reminder: When placing photocopies on Reserve, you must sign the notice concerning copyright restrictions on the reverse side of the reserve request form.

If you have any questions or need assistance, please call the Reserve Desk at 229-4954. 

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ELECTRONIC RESERVE

PLACING MATERIAL ON ELECTRONIC RESERVE: Electronic files, such as text files, Word or Adobe Acrobat are preferred for class notes, syllabi, or any material created by the faculty member. Articles from journals or chapters from books may be submitted to the electronic reserve staff for scanning, but a very clean, legible copy must be provided. If a clean copy is not available, the staff may not be able to include the item in electronic reserve. Please consult with Kathy Bowes, E-Reserve Coordinator, regarding obtaining a usable copy. It is also extremely helpful if you can provide us with a copy of the course syllabus.

FILLING CUT REOUEST FORMS: Please fill out a yellow request form for each item you want on electronic reserve. You may also fill out the reserve request form at http://www4.uwm.edu/libraries/forms/res-1.cfm.

PLEASE ALLOW TIME FOR PROCESSING: Processing material for electronic reserve is much more complex than the processing needed for traditional reserve. On average, allow approximately one week's processing time for every 50 pages of text. To ensure that your class has the materials they need available on electronic reserve by the first day of class, items which must be scanned by the Electronic Reserve staff must be received on month prior to the semester start. Materials submitted in electronic format must be received by within three weeks prior to the semester. Requests received after that date will be processed as time allows. While the staff will make every effort to process material as quickly as possible, it is not possible to guarantee that material submitted late or at the last minute can be processed in time for class use.

COPYRIGHT CONSIDERATIONS: The library may only place one article from a periodical or selected portions from a book on electronic reserve. It is not permissible to scan in large sections of a work without requesting copyright permission. If you must use an entire work, the library will write for copyright permission, but obtaining permission is usually time-consuming and may take several months. Please plan accordingly.

ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS: The library recommends that you keep file sizes as small as possible since large files may be difficult for some computers to manipulate. Documents of over 30 pages may present problems for some users. In addition, electronic reserve files are graphical, not text, files and are time consuming to print. Keeping files small limits user frustration. Since some students have limited computer access, it might be appropriate to have your course material on both electronic and traditional reserve to serve all students.

STUDENT ACC ESS TO MATERIALS ON ELECTRONIC RESERVE: Electronic reserve may be accessed from any campus computer lab, from the Library El 76 Multi-Media room or from any off-campus computer. Students accessing electronic reserve from a non-UWM computer will be routed through a proxy server to verify enrollment and will need to enter their name and UWM T.D number to obtain access. If you have distance education students who do not have a UWM ID, please ask us for air alternative ID and password for their use.

ASSISTANCE FOR STUDENTS USING ELECTRONIC RESERVE: The library has instructions on viewing electronic reserve documents in both on- and off-campus environments. Please let the electronic reserve staff know how many students will be in your classes so we may send you enough handouts for everyone. The instructions are also available on the electronic reserve home page at URL http://-Aww.uwm.edu/Library/b4eres/access.html. The library staff can provide instruction sessions for using electronic reserve. Please contact us for more information.

If you have any questions or need assistance, please contact Kathy Bowes at 229-3698 or liberes@gml.lib.uwm.edu.

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STUDENT ACCESSIBILITY CENTER

The Student Accessibility Center (SAC) promotes access to educational programming for UWM students with disabilities. Reasonable accommodations, provided through SAC, offer students of ability an equal opportunity to benefit from UWM's educational offerings. SAC services are available to students with both visible, and not readily visible, disabilities. Accommodation services are made available consistent with the individual needs of students. SAC encourages students with disabilities to contact the office upon acceptance to UWM. Such notification assists the Center in its efforts to arrange services that begin with the first day of classes, and is particularly important for students who require preparation of written materials in alternative forms, or for students using sign language interpreters. If you have any questions about the services provided by this Center, please contact them at 229-6287.


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

There are many professional fraternities, clubs and honorary organizations for students. These organizations offer the student an opportunity to learn the ins and outs of the business world and to interact with other students and professionals in a chosen field. Information about such organization may be obtained in the School's Advising Office or in the Office of Dean of Students located in Mellencamp 118.

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SECTION V:
Expectations of Conduct

STAFF CONDUCT

Classified staff conduct in regard to use of facilities as governed by the Code of Ethics set forth by the Department of Employment Relations Division of Merit Recruitment and Selection. Subsection (2) (a) of ER-MRS 24.04 states: "No employee may use or attempt to use his or her public position or state property, including property leased by the state, or use the prestige or influence of a state position to influence or gain financial or other benefits, advantages or privileges for the private benefit of the employee, the employee’s immediate family or an organization with which the employee is associated". Classifies employees also are responsible for adhering to the UW System Classified Employee Work Rules. 


POLITICAL ACTIVITIES
  • An employee may not engage in political campaign activities during hours when they are teaching a university class.
  • An employee may not solicit or receive any contribution or service for any political purpose while teaching a university class.
  • The use of university facilities is prohibited for use of any campaigning purpose.
  • If you are a candidate for election or appointive office there are additional consideration, direct any questions to your dean or division head or the Office of Legal Affairs. 

DISCRIMINATION

In April of 1990, the Wisconsin legislature enacted Statute, 36.12, which prohibit discrimination against students in the University of Wisconsin System. This statute states "that no student may be denied admission, participation or benefits or be discriminated against in any service, program, course or facility of the system or its institutions or Center because of the Students race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, disability, ancestry, age, sexual orientation, pregnancy, marital status or parental status." 

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CULTURAL SENSITIVITY

It is the responsibility of each member of our society to be sensitive to its cultural and ethnic differences, to respect these differences and to acknowledge them. Instructors are urged to be particularly sensitive as they represent a influential part of society. The following information is provided to assistance in sensitizing instructors to some of those differences.

Language
  • Many foreigners can understand far more English than they can speak.
  • In some Asian cultures it is impolite to say "no". Smiling and nodding of the head may indicate comprehension, rather than actually meaning yes. Moreover, the word "yes" as a response may only indicate that your question was heard, not necessarily an agreement.
  • Utilize written documents because it may be easier to read English than to remember it.
  • Increase use of understandable, non-verbal communication methods because these signals represent 55% of what is actually understood.
  • Watch for non-verbal signs of misunderstanding (repetitive ‘yes’, repetitive nodding and smiling) in the absence of questions. Non-verbal and verbal communication systems may vary.
  • Even within a given language, accents, usage, and differences may create communication barriers.
  • Certain cultures have difficulty pronouncing particular letters (Japanese – L’s and R’s; African-American – S’s and Th.’s; Arab – G’s and J’s; Korean/Filipino - B’s and V’s).
Family Roles and Relationships
  • Some cultures have very traditional family roles for males and females.
  • Some cultures place a higher priority upon family than upon business.
  • Latinos and Asians feel strongly about conducting business with people they know rather then with strangers.
Personal Achievement and Competition
  • Personal achievement and competition are traits highly valued by Americans.
  • Native Americans place a higher priority upon sharing and community than possessions and competition.
  • Other cultures may place a higher priority upon family than on competition, success, initiative, and material possessions, they may also place a higher value on modesty and patience.
  • Vietnamese and Asians generally discourage aggressive behavior, as opposed to teamwork and consensus building.
  • Asians, Latinos, and some Europeans may feel that showing initiative is disrespectful.
Shaking Hands
  • Arabs, Hispanics, and Greeks may shake hands repeatedly.
  • The French may feel it inappropriate to shake hands with a superior; furthermore, they may shake hands lightly and quickly.
  • Japanese, Arabs, Native Americans, and some women have relaxed handshakes; thus be careful of the strength of your grip.
  • Be alert to cultural variations regarding shaking hands with women.
  • In Germany, it is appropriate to shake hands with everyone upon arriving and leaving.
Touching
  • Many Americans dislike touches on the arms, shoulders, or back (personal preference). These public displays should generally be avoided.
  • Arabs, do not like being touched with the left hand, it is considered dirty.
  • Do not pat Koreans on the back.
  • Be cautious about touching Asians and persons from Israel, Puerto Rico, or Great Britain, because it is considered to be too familiar.
  • Do not touch children from Thailand or from many areas of Asia on the head or shoulders, the head, in particular, is sacred.
  • Some Arabs may want to touch your arm, lapel, or hand during conversation.
  • In some cultures it is extremely rude to touch an individual after touching the soles of your shoes.
Eye Contact
  • Persons from the Middle East feel that it is appropriate to keep very direct eye contact, especially with someone of the same sex. This is not meant as an aggressive gesture, and it would be offensive to look away.
  • Some Asians, particularly the Japanese, believe direct eye contact is rude and intrusive.
  • Hispanics and Europeans generally prefer to maintain direct eye contact.
  • Native Americans may not maintain eye contact
  • African Americans may have a tendency to stare while talking and look away while listening.
Social Behavior
  • The need for and Asian to ‘save face’ may be related to a lack of knowledge as opposed to a misunderstanding.
  • Some Asians may feel uncomfortable or ridiculed when they are the source of laughter, jokes, or humor.
  • Some Asians and Arabs may have noisy eating habits such as belching.
  • In some cultures, it is considered rude to leave food on your plate.
  • Some cultures feel that it is interfering to interrupt someone in mid-sentence.
Back to the top
DIALOGUE
Tools for Dialogue
  • Ask clarifying and check for understanding. "I hear you saying…"
  • Ask a question, which deepens your understanding of another’s opinion. "Can you help me understand…"
  • Ask questions about other’s assumptions and data without evoking defensiveness. "I’d like to understand that better…"
  • Make your assumptions known to others. "Here’s what I think and how I got there…"
  • Acknowledge another’s feelings.
  • Talk about your feeling/emotions without blaming
  • Talk about your needs without demanding.
  • State your opinions even if they’re not fully developed.
  • Find the truth in what you oppose. "When you said…,I agree that …"
  • Find the error in what you espouse. "The weakness of my viewpoint is... "
  • Listen without judging and without interruptions—stop talking to yourself in your head.
  • If you are stating a fact, provide "observable data" to backup what you have said.
  • If you get defensive, recognize it and ask for help to make it more productive. Take a deep breath – count to three.
  • If your "buttons" are pushed, try to review the scenarios or words in you mind that pushed your buttons.
Preparing to Dialogue about Race

" That we desperately need more open talk on this issue -- both within individual communities and between different communities -- is beyond question. Whether we have the courage, patience and sensitivity to conduct such highly charged dialogues at this time remains to be seen. "-Richard Yarborough

  • Dialogue is collaborative; two or more sides work together toward a common understanding.
  • Dialogue assumes that many people have pieces of the answer and that together they can put them into a workable solution.
  • Dialogue reveals assumptions for reevaluation.
  • Dialogue causes introspection on one’s own position.
  • Dialogue enlarges and possible changes a participant’s point of view.
  • Dialogue creates an open-minded attitude, and openness to being wrong and openness to change.
  • In dialogue one listens in order to understand the other side; find meaning and basic agreement.
  • In dialogue one searches for strength in other positions.
  • Dialogue involves real concern for the other person and seeks not to alienate or defend.